Marlon’s Special Fried Itik

Marlon's Special Fried Itik

Yes, we did crave! And we craved for Fried Itik (or Fried Duck)! As soon as we went pass Angono, that is a town in the southeast of Manila, we had Marlon’s Special Fried Itik; and all we can say is: thank you God for Angono and their Fried Itik!

Introduction

In the Philippines, every town (or neighboring towns) became popular because of its natural wonders, its people, and its food. And to submerge and experience their unique cultures, one should not limit to their breathtaking sights, but also, to their culinary specialities. So when visiting countrysides, let’s choose the local and hard-to-find cuisines over globalized fast food chains. Let’s choose our food; choose our culture; and let’s choose us — the Filipinos!

The Vanishing Culture of Turo-Turo

The surest way to find local food is to locate the oldest eateries known as Turo-Turo (i.e. Point-Point: point on a dish, wait to be served, eat it, and then pay). Back then, most Turo-Turo houses were made from nipa, bamboo, and wood while the local viands were served in clay pots and banana leaves. Some renovated to keep up with the competition, some down-scaled, and some closed due to the rising number of fast food chains and modern malls.

Marlon's Special Fried Itik

Fried Itik: Deep fried to perfection

It may not be a problem to some, but for those who are culturally-sensitive: the closures, rarity, and extinction of Turo-Turo houses that offer identifying dishes to their respective towns are signs that our identity as a culinary-gifted nation is slowly being eroded by globalization and capitalism.

It would be a sad future if our children’s local food vocabulary are limited to burgers, pizzas, and spaghettis. So before Fried Itik becomes a thing of the past, let’s rediscover, patronize, and support our local foods and Turo-Turo houses. Keep our culinary identity alive and hot!

the closures, rarity, and extinction of Turo-Turo houses that offer identifying dishes to their respective towns are signs that our identity as a culinary-gifted nation is slowly being eroded by globalization and capitalism. It would be a sad future if our children’s local food vocabulary are limited to burgers, pizzas, and spaghettis.

Marlon's Special Fried Itik

Fried Itik with Sweet Chili Sauce

The Fried Itik

If Batangas has the Bulalo, Pampanga has the Sisig, Albay has the Bicol’s Express, Ilocos has the Bagnet — the sister towns of Binangonan, Angono, Tatay, and Laguna have the Fried Itik! Hooray for them!

Facing  Laguna de Bay, these lakeside towns are located in the southeast of Manila. They are the best suppliers of the exotic Kanduli, Milkfish, and Big Head; all best cooked in tamarind soup with miso. So if there’s a lake, duck farming is nothing but natural.

Aside from fish delicacies, these town folks had invented a dish that could rival China’s Peking Duck — and that is the Fried Itik! It would be hard to pinpoint where the first recipe of the Fried Itik originated, for bragging rights, of course!

As far as I can remember, for at least decades ago, we bought Fried Itiks from either Binangonan, Angono, and Taytay. And on a historical note: Angono was part of Binangonan and Taytay; however, Angono has been gaining the recognition in where to buy Fried Itiks. Of course, the townfolks from Laguna will surely disapprove this.

Nonetheless, no matter where this recipe originated, Filipinos should be happy that Fried Itik came from these sister towns, and this business is still thriving, and still taste goooooood! 

Marlon's Special Fried Itik

Concrete signage of Marlon’s Special Fried Itik

Marlon’s Special Fried Itik (Takeaway Counter)

Most Fried Itik vendors are for takeaways only. Very few offers a restaurant-type in where you can seat, dine, and order other things. We found Marlon’s Special Fried Itik, one of the oldest vendor, on a corner street in Angono. Aside from Fried Itik, they also sell Kalderetang Itik and their special sweet chili sauce.

When you order, you can choose the size of the marinated itik from their covered bilao (i.e. woven basket). Then they will heat their large frying pan and fry your chosen itik until perfect crisp. While you wait, you can do a little chit-chat and learn new things about the duck industry.

Marlon’s Special Fried Itik per piece is priced at 160.00 Php.

Current conversion rate: 1 US $ = 48.50 Php

Fried Itik

Taytay’s Famous Beef Budbod and Angono’s Fried Itik

Club 3510 Review

Flavor

5 out 5 stars Rate: 5 out of 5 stars  |  Description: As expected, Marlon’s Special Fried Itik is consistent to the taste that a Fried Itik should be. The skin is crispy, and there’s the right balance of saltiness; the meat is soft and tender while their original recipe of sweet chili sauce made it more flavorful; and most of all, there is no meat stench. The flavor is almost similar to the Chinese Peking Duck, but minus the overwhelming fat, and the skin is not soft but crispy.

Value

5 out 5 stars Rate: 5 out of 5 stars  |  Description: Considering the cost of 160.00 Php per whole duck, this hits right in my pocket. I can eat this every day without the worry. By the way, have you seen the skyrocketing cost of a dressed duck in the groceries? And Fried Itik is way much cheaper than the roasted chickens that mushroomed over the Metro.

Service

5 out 5 stars Rate: 5 out of 5 stars  |  Description: Still excellent in my book. First, the seller allowed us to pick a duck, and then, she cooked it while we waited. She also entertained us by telling the stories about the establishment. And when we asked her in where she puts the duck’s stock, she mentioned that it was given away every morning, for free.

Overall Rate

5 out 5 stars Rate: 5 out of 5 stars  |  Description: Bottom line, anytime I will choose Fried Itik over Peking Duck. Fried Itik’s skin and meat are not fatty, so you will not get that dizzying spell after eating. But beware, Fried Itiks are best consumed within the day of frying. If you refrigerate it and consume it the next day, it will taste differently, and most likely meat stench might occur. Nonetheless, Fried Itik is delicious and unforgettable. It’s best paired with either rice or beers, and I cannot wait to go back to Angono and order three Fried Itiks! Yahuuu!

Marlon's Special Fried Itik

Recipe

Upon research, there’s a recipe provided by Panlasang Pinoy, and I could not wait to kitchen test it. It looks easy, but I would add Five Spice Powder and Cinnamon Sticks in the ingredient’s list. Let’s do this soon!

Ingredients: Itik/Duck

  • 1 pc regular-sized duck
  • 2-1/4 c water
  • 2 tbsp. rock salt
  • 1 thumb-size ginger sliced
  • 1 stalk celery sliced 1 inch-size
  • 2 cup cooking oil

Ingredients: Sweet Chili Sauce

  • 1/2 tsp. cornstarch
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 3 tbsp. vinegar
  • 1 tbsp. sugar
  • 2 pcs hot chili pepper
  • 1 tsp. salt

Instructions

  1. Clean duck very well. Simmer duck in water, salt, ginger and celery stalk for about 1-1/2 hours or until tender.
  2. Drain and dry on paper towel.
  3. Deep fry in hot oil until golden brown. Serve hot with sauce.
  4. Combine all sauce ingredients in a saucepan.
  5. Simmer while stirring continuously, until sauce thickens. Serves 6.

Contact Details

Marlon’s Special Fried Itik Address: Mauricia Diaz, Angono, Rizal, Philippines

Marlon's Special Fried Itik

Typical Turo-Turo style in where utensils are served on a table

References

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